Peter Hook at the Danforth Music Hall, Toronto in 2014.  Photo: Dave MacIntyre
Peter Hook at the Danforth Music Hall, Toronto in 2014. Photo: Dave MacIntyre

By Dave MacIntyre

Peter Hook, the legendary bass player and co-founder of Joy Division and New Order turned 59 today so what better time to look back on one of Step On Magazine’s favourite publications written by Hooky himself.

The Haçienda: How Not to Run a Club is a hilarious, often harrowing tale about one of the most important night clubs of the 80s and 90s.  Pretty much from the day its doors opened until its final closure in 1997, the Manchester super club hemorrhaged money at a staggering rate.  Hooky recounts that the management and owners (Factory Records, New Order and Tony Wilson) calculated at one point that every “punter” that walked through the door, actually cost the venue £10.00.  The hotspot was plagued with violence, drugs, gangs, door staff on the take and the only people making any money were the DJs and the criminals.  But what a glorious storied venue nonetheless.

Step On's signed copy of the book.
Step On’s signed copy of the book.

The Smiths played there as did Madonna in her first UK appearance.  So did James, The Fall, Echo and The Bunnymen, Inspiral Carpets, The Stone Roses, The Happy Mondays and quite obviously, New Order.  The Haçienda was also the place to be during the Acid House and Madchester heyday and stories abound in the book about the madness that unfolded almost nightly.

It’s a great read written in the voice of a friend telling you a crazy no-holds-barred story while you sit in the pub surrounded by pint glasses. In fact we recommend you pick up a copy, cozy up to the bar in your favourite local establishment and dig in.

Peter Hook at the Danforth Music Hall, Toronto in 2014.  Photo: Dave MacIntyre
Peter Hook at the Danforth Music Hall, Toronto in 2014. Photo: Dave MacIntyre